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How To Avoid Streaming Burn-Out and Getting Bored of Playing Games

 

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Avoid Streaming Burn-Out

 Our previous guide to make game streaming a job detailed the behind-the-scenes investment for successful game streaming, with one key factor standing out above all: Time.

Investing all of that time streaming, researching games and audio / video equipment, and making sponsorship connections – that's tiring work. It's tough to keep a consistent streaming schedule, but keeping a schedule while also maintaining the balance of business (and staying informed on the industry) is where lines get drawn.

Try to avoid burn-out. This includes getting plain “bored” of playing games at all, but also of the grind that is running a channel and streaming. This article includes a few tips on avoiding content creation burn-out.

 

 Get Friends Involved

There are plenty of roles available that could get friends involved, or even just contractors. Video editing and production is certainly one, if working on YouTube content, and would immensely lighten your workload to enable focusing on the content creation process. If the channel isn't yet making enough to hire folks properly, see if you can get any friends enthusiastic enough to contribute on a rev-share (revenue share) basis. Make clear to the friend(s) what the financial situation is, just so there aren't hurt feelings or relationships, and then see if they want to get involved.

It sounds potentially small, but just having a few hours of help per week can seriously improve the mood of content creation. It's motivating to have someone sitting there with you. The minor benefits alone are nice – like being able to complain about comments or software. That's all important stuff to lessening the isolation of content creation, and keeping things fresh and fun.

Also consider getting friends involved in the actual stream. If you're struggling to pass that hurdle of consistent, daily content output, it'd help to bring on a friend to host their own stream one or two days per week. In this regard, the channel becomes somewhat of a network of gamers – people who produce quality, similar content (or dissimilar; it's equally useful to have some differences), and are able to do so with high regularity.

 

Try New Games

If your stream is primarily focused on a single game, consider streaming something else for a little while. Explore outside of the normal genres of play. If you're a competitive FPS player, give an indie platformer a shot – something fun, simple, and easy to play one time. Heck, you could even stream that process and make it a recurring segment (but be wary of the below!).

 

Don't Forget to Do Something Else!

Getting sucked into game streaming as a job does mean that it's hard to look at games outside the scope of content creation. These walls start springing up: “How can I turn this game into content?”

Don't let that take over. Either try to get some solo, unstreamed gaming in, or just do something else. Physical games, unstreamed, can help keep the mind fresh with ideas for content creation without necessitating the constant worry of making the most of those hours. Magic: The Gathering, Settlers of Catan, or other board games are good experiences. Keeping the brain fresh with different inputs will help more than it may seem on the surface.

Or just take a break. That's OK, too. Let followers know that you'll be off for a few hours, or maybe a day, and then come back ready to roll.

 

Created on Sunday, 18 December 2016 23:54
Written by Catalyst
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